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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Clapper: But what we do not do, is spy unlawfully on Americans or for that matter spy indiscriminately on the citizens of any country. We only spy for valid foreign intelligence purposes as authorized by law with multiple layers of oversight to ensure we don't abuse our authorities.
James Clapper
Director of National Intelligence
CSPAN2 10/29/2013
Clapper: (we do understand) the concerns on the part of the public. I’m a Vietnam veteran and I remember the congressional investigations of the 1970s later disclosed, and I was in the intelligence community then, that some intelligence programs were carried out for domestic political purposes without proper legal authorization or oversight. But having lived through that, as a part of the intelligence community I can now assure the American people that the intelligence community today is not like that. We operate within a robust framework of strict rules and rigorous oversight involving all three branches of the government.
Brian Shactman
Host of Way Too Early
MSNBCW 10/29/2013
Shactman: While the president may be poised to order a ban on eavesdropping on friendly leaders it's still not clear what exactly the White house knew and when. The agency said it did not inform the president of reported monitoring of German Chancellor Angela Merkel but the
Brian Shactman
Host of Way Too Early
MSNBCW 10/29/2013
Shactman: A landmark bill is said to be introduced in congress today addressing the NSA oversight on American soil. The USA Freedom Act would end bulk collection of U.S. phone records. It would also make it harder to target U.S. communications and require the government to more aggressively purge information accidentally collected on Americans.
Dianne Feinstein quoted
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 10/29/2013
Shactman: We want to start this morning with the NSA. This morning it’s not just America’s allies who are upset over the agencies wiretapping. One of the staunchest backers, Diane Feinstein now calling for a full review of the mass data collection at home and abroad. the California democrat who chairs the senate intelligence committee says she's totally opposed to spying on U.S. allies. According to her, congress has not been adequately kept in the loop. Feinstein also said the administration assured her surveillance would not continue, a point that some officials later challenged.
Dianne Feinstein quoted
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 10/29/2013
Hall: The chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Dianne Feinstein who has been a lawyer defender of the NSA has broken ranks with the agency and is now calling for a full review of all of their surveillance programs. Senator Feinstein says she quote, “totally opposed to spying on U.S. allies and adds that Congress has not been kept in the loop. Feinstein's republican counterpart, on the Intelligence Committee, republican Susan Collins, agrees in a statement she says, she notes “there's no justification for collecting intel on leaders of our closest allies and said she will meet with the German Ambassador tonight to say she is opposed to the phone tapping.
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
FOXNEWSW 10/31/2013
Alexander: This is not NSA breaking into any databases it would be illegal for us to do that. and so I don't know what the report is, but i can tell you factually we do not have access to Google servers, Yahoo servers, dot dot dot. We go through a court order. Wallace: General Keith Alexander, head of the NSA reacting to a new report that his agency has broken into Yahoo and Google communications links.
Chris Wallace
Journalist and Host of FOX News Sunday
FOXNEWSW 10/31/2013
Chris Wallace: It seemed like the term of art there was “server.” Because the allegation is, yes, we get court orders to get information from Yahoo and Google, but this is some sort of back door breaking into their system without a court order.
Gwen Ifill
Co-Anchor and Managing Editor, PBS NewsHour
KQED 10/31/2013
Ifill: U.S. intelligence agencies have gained access to hundreds of millions of Google and Yahoo user accounts by secretly tapping into company data centers. Late today, six top tech companies-- Yahoo, Google, AOL Apple, Microsoft and Facebook-- sent a letter to Congress, calling for enhanced privacy protections. Barton Gellman broke the story for
Barton Gellman
Journalist, contributing to the Washington Post
KQED 10/31/2013
Gellman: Yesterday General Alexander, the head of the N.S.A., denied that the N.S.A. is tapping into the servers or databases or data centers of Google and Yahoo! That's not what we said. What we said is they're tapping into the traffic that's between data center here and the data center there. So they're capturing the data as it moves across the net, not in storage where it's at rest.
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